“The results support what we all have known ó older windows can be maintained and upgraded with weatherization techniques to perform as well as or to outperform modern replacement windows.” óJohn Leeke
“The results support what we all have known ó older windows can be maintained and upgraded with weatherization techniques to perform as well as or to outperform modern replacement windows.” óJohn Leeke

To set standards for maintaining and upgrading old and historic windows, some restoration specialists formed the Window Preservation Standards Collaborative (WPSC).

Founders John Leeke, Bob Yapp, Duffy Hoffman, Jim Turner, and David Gibney noticed an increase in the number of architects and engineers specifying window preservation, but some of the window work had to be redone due to inexperienced installers.

The founders — all members of the Preservation Trades Network — arranged for that organization to collect and dispense WPSC’s grants and donations. They received an endorsement from the National Trust for Historic Preservation and are seeking grants from state historic preservation offices.

During the organization’s first summit in 2010, architect Walter Sedovic designed tests of repair and maintenance techniques on six older windows, which were set in an old wood and stone structure. The tests showed that the windows could be upgraded to match new window standards. In addition to preserving the architectural character of a building, Leeke says, the repair techniques cost less than replacing the units. The group plans to form an alliance with Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories for additional testing.

WPSC will post a draft of written standards on its site soon and invites comments. They hope to have a final draft by 2012. ptnresource.org/WPSC; johnleeke@historichomeworks.com

—Nina Patel, senior editor, REMODELING.