This master bedroom and bathroom suite is part of a $1 million whole-house transformation of a property on Lake Minnetonka, Minn. The original house was a 1970s split-level with one modest addition. The homeowners hired Murphy Bros. Designers & Remodelers of Blaine, Minn., to add more space and create design interest for the house.

The existing master bedroom was a 14-foot-by-14-foot square with a small bath, 8-foot ceilings, and a balcony. The remodeler added a second level to accommodate the new master suite, which measures 16 feet by 20 feet and has vaulted ceilings.

For this octagonal vanity, the homeowners chose custom cabinets with a white  enamel finish. Remodeler John Murphy mounted mirrors on the short walls at  the end of the run of cabinetry and fitted towel bars and electrical outlets  on the sides of the cabinetry. The vaulted ceiling above the vanity includes  recessed lighting, but Murphy also added sconces on the sides and rope  lighting in the toe kick.
Doug Hill For this octagonal vanity, the homeowners chose custom cabinets with a white enamel finish. Remodeler John Murphy mounted mirrors on the short walls at the end of the run of cabinetry and fitted towel bars and electrical outlets on the sides of the cabinetry. The vaulted ceiling above the vanity includes recessed lighting, but Murphy also added sconces on the sides and rope lighting in the toe kick.

CHANGE OF PLAN The architect who initially worked on the design had located the master bath in the space that is now the bedroom. Murphy Bros. owner John Murphy says the homeowner was not happy with that floor plan because the bedroom would have had a view of the driveway. “So we flip-flopped the location of the bedroom and bath,” Murphy says. The owners can now see the lake through the window wall in the bedroom.

Murphy placed the walk-in closet in the section with the driveway view. The remodeler says that reconfiguring the plan also created space for a stacked washer/dryer in a closet.

The bathroom includes a walk-in, glass-enclosed shower and a compartmentalized toilet. As for the vanity, at first the team had placed it on an interior wall but then saw the logic in fitting it into the octagonal turret.

To create curb appeal, Murphy varied the window height. When installing the vanity in the turret, the crew had to match the counter height to each window. The remodeler's lead carpenter carefully framed the turret and worked with the drywall subcontractor to maintain plumb corners and walls. Murphy says it took the granite installers longer to install the stone because they had to seam several pieces together to fit the octagon.

The turret adds design interest to the home's exterior as well as additional  space to the master bath. The windows are set at different heights to match  the angle of the roof.
The turret adds design interest to the home's exterior as well as additional space to the master bath. The windows are set at different heights to match the angle of the roof.

The new master bedroom's arched window wall frames a view of the lake.
The new master bedroom's arched window wall frames a view of the lake.