This small bathroom need an updated look, but as it was squeezed between a stair wall and an adjacent bedroom, the remodel had to fit within the existing footprint. Designer Mariette Barsoum of Divine Kitchens in Westborough, Mass., stayed within the 41/2-foot-by-almost-10-foot space and maintained the location of the existing fixtures.

Designer Mariette Barsoum says that frameless glass is the best solution for a smallspace shower. “The less the better,” she says. “There are a lot of other textures in the room, and we did not want the shower to be a focal point.” For the shower floor, she chose smaller 2-inch-square versions of the wall tile, but added bright touches of blue, red, and green using glass tile inserts.
Loretta Berardinelli, Berardinelli Photography Designer Mariette Barsoum says that frameless glass is the best solution for a smallspace shower. “The less the better,” she says. “There are a lot of other textures in the room, and we did not want the shower to be a focal point.” For the shower floor, she chose smaller 2-inch-square versions of the wall tile, but added bright touches of blue, red, and green using glass tile inserts.

The rich tones of this custom mahogany vanity add a touch of drama to the guest bathís otherwise neutral palette. Both the large glass-door storage cabinet and the 6-inch high shelf are mounted on the wall. The cabinet is topped with a Carrera marble countertop set with an undermount stainless steel sink.
Loretta Berardinelli, Berardinelli Photography The rich tones of this custom mahogany vanity add a touch of drama to the guest bathís otherwise neutral palette. Both the large glass-door storage cabinet and the 6-inch high shelf are mounted on the wall. The cabinet is topped with a Carrera marble countertop set with an undermount stainless steel sink.

The clients of this whole-house remodel were split on the design of the renovation — the wife leaned toward contemporary while the husband preferred a more traditional style. Barsoum says that they compromised by creating a rustic family room for the husband, which has a rosewood mantel, knotty alder entertainment units, and fieldstone above the fireplace. The new kitchen, master suite, and this guest bath have a modern design.

Barsoum removed the existing heat register under the window and replaced it with electric heat under the diagonally laid porcelain tile floor. A wall-mounted towel warmer in front of the toilet provides additional heat.
Loretta Berardinelli, Berardinelli Photography Barsoum removed the existing heat register under the window and replaced it with electric heat under the diagonally laid porcelain tile floor. A wall-mounted towel warmer in front of the toilet provides additional heat.

Though the clean, modern lines of this bathroom are suitable for the 1980s house, Barsoum has noticed a general trend toward more modern design, even in the very traditional homes of New England.

The guest bath has simple lines and neutral colors. Barsoum and fellow designer Heidi Marika-Perez covered all the walls with a 12-by-24-inch gray-toned tile, and used similar soft tones on the tile floor. “It was such a small bathroom, it was hard to know where to stop the tile,” Barsoum says, “and we wanted it to be uniform and seamless all the way around.”