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The arched cabinetry wall in this kitchen design helps to delineate this home's kitchen and dining spaces.

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This project was one of seven kitchens completed by Peggy and Dave Mackowski, owners of Quality Design and Construction, in 2008 — a banner year for kitchens for the company. These particular homeowners sought out QDC because they were impressed with the quality of finishes they had seen in the company’s house-tour projects.

The clients, owners of a Raleigh, N.C., townhouse, wanted to open the kitchen to the living room and dining room to improve traffic flow and to create a more cohesive space.

The clients, owners of a Raleigh, N.C., townhouse, wanted to open the kitchen to the living room and dining room to improve traffic flow and to create a more cohesive space. The homeowners showed remodelers David and Peggy Mackowski of Quality Design and Construction a photo of an arched opening they liked, and they wanted to use that as the design inspiration for delineating the dining room and kitchen spaces.
Ray Strawbridge The clients, owners of a Raleigh, N.C., townhouse, wanted to open the kitchen to the living room and dining room to improve traffic flow and to create a more cohesive space. The homeowners showed remodelers David and Peggy Mackowski of Quality Design and Construction a photo of an arched opening they liked, and they wanted to use that as the design inspiration for delineating the dining room and kitchen spaces.

This would require removing both the wall between the dining room and kitchen and the knee wall between the living room and kitchen. The homeowners had a photo of an arched opening they liked, and they wanted to use that as the design inspiration for delineating the dining room and kitchen spaces.

This microwave drawer doubles as a warming drawer and fits well in spaces with limited wall space, but it can be prohibitively expensive for some clients.
Ray Strawbridge This microwave drawer doubles as a warming drawer and fits well in spaces with limited wall space, but it can be prohibitively expensive for some clients.

To build a structure around the arched cabinetry, Dave had to tap into his engineering background. The homeowners wanted a 42-inch-high counter on the dining room side, and the downdraft range on the kitchen side had venting that had to be hidden, so Dave built a knee wall to support the counter and conceal the venting.

The clients needed to maximize storage in this townhouse kitchen. The island has two pedestal legs that hide 12-inch-deep storage cabinets. One panel on each leg is an operable door.
Ray Strawbridge The clients needed to maximize storage in this townhouse kitchen. The island has two pedestal legs that hide 12-inch-deep storage cabinets. One panel on each leg is an operable door.

“Then we put down the base cabinets, put on the granite, and built the arch on top of the structure,” he says.

The upper cabinets are attached to only one wall, so the crew had to build sturdy bracing across the top of the structure and at the other end. They installed a wood plate under the 16-inch-high cabinet on the end of the arch wall. A post extends from this cabinet box through the knee wall.

“The granite shelf sits on the knee wall, and we cut a 4-inch-by-4-inch hole under that 16-inch-high cabinet, which allowed us to physically fasten it to the knee wall below,” Dave says. “It required a lot of coordination with the granite people to make sure that all this stuff stacked and lined up.”

—Nina Patel, senior editor, REMODELING.