The homeowners wanted to create a spa-like feel for their master bath but stay within the existing footprint of the room. The original bath had stark white cabinets and fixtures, including an extra-large tub. “The before shot was a classic example of builder baths in the 1980s. It was a room full of objects without a compelling design theme,” says Scott Hommas, a principal with Curtis Gelotte Architects in Kirkland, Wash.

Architect Scott Hommas chose to reorient the skylight to line up with the vanity cabinet. He also covered it with a glass diffuser that is set with LED lighting. A glass screen over the tub has the same type of lighting (see “Light Work,” below). The sliding glass doors at the entry to the walk-in closet are made to resemble shoji screens. “It's amazing how hardware or doors can enhance a space,” Hommas says.
kpstudios Architect Scott Hommas chose to reorient the skylight to line up with the vanity cabinet. He also covered it with a glass diffuser that is set with LED lighting. A glass screen over the tub has the same type of lighting (see “Light Work,” below). The sliding glass doors at the entry to the walk-in closet are made to resemble shoji screens. “It's amazing how hardware or doors can enhance a space,” Hommas says.

Hommas says that to stay within the footprint, it became obvious that the project needed a smaller, deeper tub. The new custom-made copper soaking tub was made to fit in a niche created by removing a small linen closet. The tub's curved front allows for easier circulation within the room, and its marble top and copper band match the top and band that run along the length of the two-sink vanity on the opposite wall. The smaller tub created space for one of the client's requests — a larger shower.

Hommas fitted storage into tiled niches, set into the wall above the tub, and in a built-in unit near the door. “We just used what was there to its full potential,” he says.

Downsizing to a soaking tub allowed Hommas to create an open floor plan with space for a large shower. This custom copper tub fits a space that was created by removing a linen closet.
kpstudios Downsizing to a soaking tub allowed Hommas to create an open floor plan with space for a large shower. This custom copper tub fits a space that was created by removing a linen closet.

Light Work Tiny LED lights are used behind the glass screens above the tub and over the skylight. The homeowner was working with these lights at his job and wanted to use them in the bath design. He can program the lights in the space to create any color or flashing pattern, and even spell out words. “It is all about mood,” architect Scott Hommas says. “And lighting is a big part of that.”

The lights require little energy and last a long time, so they can be used in hard-to-reach areas, including inside glass block. Though expensive and mostly used for commercial work, the designer expects to see more LED lights in residential applications in the near future.

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