The bath remodel fulfills the need for storage and provides natural light.
Peter Tata The bath remodel fulfills the need for storage and provides natural light.

This bathroom remodel was in a home with 2-foot thick masonry perimeter walls. Demolition revealed a window that had been covered up — leaving a deep opening in the wall. Stewart Davis, design director of CG&S Design-Build in Austin, Texas, decided to design a cabinet to fit the space.

The custom cherry cabinet matches the vanity and is 6 feet 6 inches tall, 30 inches wide, and 16 inches deep. The room did not have enough floor space to include all the storage the homeowners wanted, so this solution was a welcome addition to the project.

Davis had opted to have the cabinet flush with the surrounding tile wall, but once the rough-hewn tile on the walls was installed, he realized that the variations in the tiles' surface made that design impossible. “If it was drywall, we could have pulled it off,” Davis says. Instead, the crew used narrow trim to create a clean, finished edge.

The master bath had no exterior windows, so to add light, Davis chose to extend the 8-foot ceiling by going up to the existing rafters and adding a skylight and gable window. “No matter how much lighting you add, it cannot take the place of natural light,” he says. The motorized awning window in the gable is controlled by a switch in the bathroom.