National Public Radio correspondent Rae Ellen Bichell reports on some queasy statistics: at least half of those who work in public places continue to go to work even if they have a cold or the flu. The findings come from a poll conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Workers often show up to work because they don’t have any paid sick leave.

Anthony Peeples, who has worked at Olive Garden and now is a bartender in Michigan City, Ind., told NPR the realities of having to pay your bills, force people to be on the job while sick,

"I don't think anybody really wants to go out there and get people sick or let alone work when they're miserable, but you have to. Or else you're not going to be able to pay your electricity or water or your rent.”

Many employees in a poll by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that they showed up to work for fear of loosing their jobs, lacking a backup option, and concern over leaving their co-workers short-staffed.

Having sick employees on the job doesn’t help anyone. If an employee shows up sick, they end up getting others sick in return meaning you loose more and more of your workforce. Making sure you have a healthy and capable workforce requires employers to be diligent about monitoring worker’s safety. Have you taken a look at your company’s sick leave policy?

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