Certain parts of the city remain virtually untouched since Katrina struck. The downed power lines and damaged buildings are a reminder of the storm's forcefulness. It's unclear how this boat found its way to the end of this suburban street, but it's a safe bet it wasn't there before.
Don Jackson | JLC Certain parts of the city remain virtually untouched since Katrina struck. The downed power lines and damaged buildings are a reminder of the storm's forcefulness. It's unclear how this boat found its way to the end of this suburban street, but it's a safe bet it wasn't there before.

Piles of rubble from damaged and demolished houses are not uncommon sights. The garbage that litters the streets and lawns provides an interesting juxtaposition: Evidence of life in what appears at first glance to be a ghost town.
Don Jackson | JLC Piles of rubble from damaged and demolished houses are not uncommon sights. The garbage that litters the streets and lawns provides an interesting juxtaposition: Evidence of life in what appears at first glance to be a ghost town.

At the end of the month, a year will have passed since Hurricane Katrina hammered the Gulf Coast. Although people have slowly filtered back into the city, the Big Easy is still very much a shell of her former self.

Earlier this summer, local remodeler Mike Davis took editors Don Jackson and Patrick McCombe of THE JOURNAL OF LIGHT CONSTRUCTION (a sister publication of REMODELING) on a two-day tour of the city. Here's some of what they saw.

This street is quite busy, compared to many in the city of New Orleans. Construction vans ó belonging to all manner of contractors ó are pretty much the only vehicles you see in these storm-ravaged residential neighborhoods. Other than demolition, mold remediation, and reconstruction, there's not much reason to be here.(The discoloration at the base of the trees in the photo is unrelated to the storm.)
Don Jackson | JLC This street is quite busy, compared to many in the city of New Orleans. Construction vans ó belonging to all manner of contractors ó are pretty much the only vehicles you see in these storm-ravaged residential neighborhoods. Other than demolition, mold remediation, and reconstruction, there's not much reason to be here.(The discoloration at the base of the trees in the photo is unrelated to the storm.)

Like many homes in New Orleans, the interior of this house was ruined by water damage. Stripping the walls revealed stained ó but apparently still structurally sound ó framing upon which the homeowners can begin to rebuild.
Patrick McCombe | JLC Like many homes in New Orleans, the interior of this house was ruined by water damage. Stripping the walls revealed stained ó but apparently still structurally sound ó framing upon which the homeowners can begin to rebuild.

According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), 72,252 travel trailers and 3,460 mobile homes are occupied in the state of Louisiana by victims of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. (No reliable estimates were available specifically for New Orleans, nor for the number of people living in the temporary housing.) The average trailer measures 240 square feet.