The Golden Door Reopens

Our current era of immigration isn't as obvious as in the days when teeming masses steamed by the Statue of Liberty and landed at Ellis Island. But by 2050, the impact will be just as profound.

Based on total population, including children and adults.Source: 2000-2012 data and all second-generation data from Pew Research Center analysis of Current Population surveys, Integrated Microdata Sample (IPUMS ) files; Pew Hispanic Center projections for 2020-2050 from Passel and Cohn (2008); historical trend from Passel and Cohn (2008) and Edmonston and Passel (1994)
Based on total population, including children and adults.
Source: 2000-2012 data and all second-generation data from Pew Research Center analysis of Current Population surveys, Integrated Microdata Sample (IPUMS ) files; Pew Hispanic Center projections for 2020-2050 from Passel and Cohn (2008); historical trend from Passel and Cohn (2008) and Edmonston and Passel (1994)


Fewer Babies, More Arrivals

As the birth rate drops, immigrants are set to become the chief contributor to population growth.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division


Latin Wave

Since 1965, 22,111,000 people have immigrated to the U.S. from Latin America, accounting for 50% of all immigrants. That's more than all the immigrants that came to the U.S. between 1890 and 1919.

Source: Pew Research Center
Source: Pew Research Center


Carpenter Crunch

Three-quarters of the NAHB members polled in 2012 had no trouble finding finish carpenters. Now most do—and for some, it's a serious problem.

Source: NAHB Surveys
Source: NAHB Surveys