Arizona artist and remodeler Dana Ball made the covers for these light fixtures by heating circular pieces of Plexiglas in an oven and placing them on the cardboard Sonotube to fit the curve of the column. He used spacers to keep the covers at a consistent distance from the column. Drawer knobs that match those on the kitchen cabinets are used to secure the covers. The bolts for the knobs pierce the Sonotube and are secured with nuts to allow easy access for lightbulb replacement.
COURTESY ART GUY DESIGN Arizona artist and remodeler Dana Ball made the covers for these light fixtures by heating circular pieces of Plexiglas in an oven and placing them on the cardboard Sonotube to fit the curve of the column. He used spacers to keep the covers at a consistent distance from the column. Drawer knobs that match those on the kitchen cabinets are used to secure the covers. The bolts for the knobs pierce the Sonotube and are secured with nuts to allow easy access for lightbulb replacement.

During a kitchen remodeling project, artist and remodeler Dana Ball of Art Guy Design, in Scottsdale, Ariz., removed a wall to open the kitchen to the adjacent living room and found a structural post that had to remain.

He decided to highlight the post by tiling it, tying it in with the kitchen backsplash pattern. “We could have removed the support, but the impact would not have been worth the cost,” Ball says. “Instead, I shrouded it and made it an aesthetic anchor in the space.”

Ball covered the existing post, made of two 2x4s, with Sonotube forming tube — a cardboard product used for cylindrical concrete forms — by cutting it lengthwise and wrapping it around the wood frame.

The column is covered with 1-inch-square travertine tiles. The lights are surrounded by mosaic frames of handmade Mexican tile in bright primary colors that match the mosaic stripe in the kitchen backsplash, which gradually moves from yellow and orange to blue and purple.
COURTESY ART GUY DESIGN The column is covered with 1-inch-square travertine tiles. The lights are surrounded by mosaic frames of handmade Mexican tile in bright primary colors that match the mosaic stripe in the kitchen backsplash, which gradually moves from yellow and orange to blue and purple.

He ran electrical wiring inside the tube, securing it with 2x4 furring pieces between the post and inner side of the tube, and poured 10 inches of grout at the base. He wrapped the exterior with chicken wire and adhered the tile to that.

Ball cut into the upper section of column to fit in a floating transom with a cherry frame, which houses lighting. “This false ceiling around the perimeter of the kitchen helps anchor the cabinetry on either side and brings task lighting down to a more usable distance,” Ball says. The transom also helps transition from the higher living room ceiling and creates a cozy feel in the kitchen.