The PLS2 from Pacific Laser Systems is battery-operated and is designed for indoor use. 800.601.4500. www.plslaser.com.
The PLS2 from Pacific Laser Systems is battery-operated and is designed for indoor use. 800.601.4500. www.plslaser.com.

Manual leveling gave way to self-leveling, dots led to lines, single beams split into multiple beams, and functionality increased at the same time that lasers became easier to use. So goes the trend that is evident in today's laser levels. But it doesn't stop there. The tools are becoming smaller and even easier to handle.

Take Zircon's LaserBall 360 that is about the size of a tennis ball and can be mounted on any flat surface using its self-adhesive strips. The device can be rotated to fit any project and includes a bubble level to guarantee accuracy.

According to its manufacturer, Pacific Laser Systems, accuracy is also an attractive feature of the battery-operated PLS2, which is accurate to 1/8 inch at a distance of 30 feet.

The size of a tennis ball, Zircon's LaserBall 360 demonstrates the trend toward smaller laser levels. 800.245.9265. www.zircon.com.
The size of a tennis ball, Zircon's LaserBall 360 demonstrates the trend toward smaller laser levels. 800.245.9265. www.zircon.com.

Where does the trend go from here? “It won't be long before you can lay out a building with one click,” says Matt Miles, Leica Geosystems marketing director. “Laser distance measuring and close-tolerance GPS will allow us to get there.”

Adapted from a story that first appeared in TOOLS OF THE TRADE magazine, a sister publication to REMODELING.