Go to main article BEFORE + AFTER: A Team

Four conceptual sketches addressing the entry and window plan for this remodel's new A-gable end hide larger issues.

Sketch 1
Sketch 1

Sketch 2
Sketch 2

In the first three sketches, architect Alan Freysinger conceptualized a roof identical, ridge to eaves, to that of the existing house. But those plans squeezed useable space at the knee wall, and space became even tighter when his client added an office and back entrance for visitors coming in from skiing or swimming. The second sketch shows a concept addressing front and back entrances, but Freysinger says the static design over-relied on the A motif. "The aesthetics didn't seem right," he says.

In the end (sketch four), Freysinger eliminated the matching roof and low knee wall, designing a less steep roof (13/12 vs. 15/12 pitch) and 8-foot bearing walls. This allows more useable interior space and a ridge line that joins nicely with the extended home. It also keeps the addition subordinate to the main structure.

Sketch 3
Sketch 3

Sketch 4
Sketch 4

Instead of using his original plan for a wall of glass, the architect settled on a half-wall of windows, which draws a visitor's attention away from the window and focuses it on the helical stair. The window plan also diminishes the A motif. Taller bearing walls (sketch four) increase the useable interior space by 5 feet on each side. In the same sketch, the addition also was lengthened about 6 feet.

The design in the third sketch allowed no entry shelter. By making the bearing walls taller, the eave line goes to the top of the door, allowing for a shed roof and Craftsman-style supporting brackets. "I'm big on design being a progression from outside space to inside/outside space to inside space. That's what the brackets and the canopy help do," Freysinger says.